Fuller calls on Coast Guard to ‘stand on the right side of history’ / Northwest Citizen, Guest writer, Rob Lewis

Matt Fuller photographed Feb. 15. Fuller awaits the outcome of his March 17 appeal hearing.

Rob Lewis guest writes this report.

Wed, Mar 23, 2016, 2:37 pm  Guest writer, Rob Lewis

SEATTLE — During his March 17 appeal hearing, Matt Fuller delivered a detailed and unapologetic defense of his 22-hour occupation of the anchor chain on the Arctic Challenger, a drilling-support vessel for Shell Oil Company.

Fuller’s family and friends attended the hearing before a U.S. Coast Guard officer, on the 34th floor of the Henry M. Jackson Federal Building. He was appealing a citation and a $10,000 fine he received for violating a 100-yard “safety zone” around the Arctic Challenger when it was moored in May 2015 in Bellingham Harbor. Fuller climbed onto the vessel’s anchor chain as part of a local citizen effort to keep it from leaving port, in order to prevent oil drilling in the Arctic. […]

Read Rob’s complete article on NorthwestCitizen here.

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One thought on “Fuller calls on Coast Guard to ‘stand on the right side of history’ / Northwest Citizen, Guest writer, Rob Lewis

  1. Those who believe’s the “Supreme Ruler of the Universe” defined in the State Constitution, makes them King & Queen, obviously attended a local lower learning institution.

    United States v. Gary Locke, always low IQ, Always!

    b. Because the United States is a “flag state” (meaning that it is responsible for developing standards and regulations for ships flying the U.S. flag), a “port state” (meaning that U.S. ports receive cargo, and oil in particular, arriving on foreign-flag vessels), and a “coastal state” (meaning that foreign flag vessels navigate through U.S. coastal waters without entering its ports), the United States has a substantial interest in ensuring that all vessels that transit its waters, particularly foreign-flag vessels, comply with comprehensive safety and environmental protection standards.

    http://www.admiraltylawguide.com/supct/Locke.pdf

    Like

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